Learning Curves

One of Classy Little Fashions Foundation’s goals is to promote body positivity. Designing fashionable clothing, tailored to the specific requirements of our Classy Clients, is one important step we take in reaching this goal – in fact, it’s what we are best known for!

Biz Jane

Having stylish, comfortable clothing that fits properly is guaranteed to facilitate confidence, especially within the professional who has difficulty finding affordable custom clothing appropriate for the workplace. The path to obtaining a positive body image doesn’t end with simply having a chic new wardrobe though. There are other elements to consider and we are always eager to learn new ways of making a Classy Client feel empowered and comfortable in his/her own skin.

Recently, Classy Little Fashions Foundation hosted a #FashionWish Twitter Party. Our co-hosts for this classy event were Reveca Torres, Andrew Morrison-Gurza, Sarah Della, and Mitchell Dunnam. We have found that Twitter Parties, with an awesome line-up of co-hosts, are really a fun way to learn more about the needs and wants of those our organization serves.

The most significant lesson we learned from our recent Twitter Party is the importance of diversifying our language. In the context of fashion, there is no established terminology for describing the unique bodies that we clothe; there is only medical terminology, which is not appropriate or empowering for most. In a sense, we are pioneering new terminology.

mgm

Thus far, we have described the population we cater to as having a “non-standard body type due to physical disability.” However, at our #FashionWish Twitter Party, some participants voiced that “non-standard” may be considered negative instead of empowering. It was further suggested that we employ the use of the word “asymmetrical” instead.

We understand the old adage, “You can please some of the people all of the time. You can please all of the people some of the time. But, you can’t please all of the people all of the time.” In our mission to promote body positivity, we do our very best to be sensitive and respectful to the population we cater to. Therefore, expect to see more use of the term “asymmetrical” and less use of “non-standard.”